Hero of February: Sarojini Naidu

Women February 2019 Figure - Sarojini Naidu-01Our woman hero of February is Sarojini Naidu! She was an Indian independence activist. She took part in the National Movement, became a follower of Mahatma Gandhi and fought for the attainment of Swaraj. She became the President of Indian National Congress and later she was appointed taao the Governor of the United Provinces, now Uttar Pradesh. Known as the ‘Nightingale of India’, she was also a noted poet. Her poetry includes children’s poems, nature poems, patriotic poems and poems of love and death. Continue reading

Hero of January: Kinue Hitomi

Women January 2019 Figure - Kinue Hitomi-01There are still many remarkable women out there that have always been parts of the great history of the world. They are notable figures to be look upon to; their acts, contributions, and roles inspire us even until today. To keep up with the tradition started on 2018, each month Adorageek celebrates the life of a woman hero. And our woman hero of January is Kinue Hitomi! She was a Japanese athlete, the world record holder in several events in the 1920s – 1930s, and the first Japanese woman to win an Olympic medal. Continue reading

Hero of December: Mary Somerville

Our woman hero of December is Mary Somerville! She was a Scottish science writer and polymath. She studied mathematics and astronomy, and was nominated to be jointly the first female member of the Royal Astronomical Society at the same time as Caroline Herschel. When Mary died in 1872, The Morning Post declared in her obituary that she is the queen of science. Continue reading

Hero of November: Marie Curie

Marie Curie 2018 Marie-v2-01Our woman hero of November is Marie Curie! She was a Polish and naturalized-French physicist and chemist who conducted pioneering research on radioactivity. Marie Curie was also the first woman to win a Nobel Prize, the first person and only woman to win twice, the only person to win a Nobel Prize in two different sciences, and was part of the Curie family legacy of five Nobel Prizes.
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Hero of October: Ellen Johnson Sirleaf

Our woman hero of October is Ellen Johnson Sirleaf! She is a Liberian politician who served as the 24th President of Liberia from 2006 to 2018. She was the first elected female head of state in Africa. Sirleaf was listed as the 83rd-most powerful woman in the world by Forbes magazine in 2016. In 2010, Newsweek listed her as one of the ten best leaders in the world, while Time counted her among the top ten female leaders. That same year, The Economist called her “arguably the best president the country has ever had.” In 2010, Sirleaf released her first book, This Child Will Be Great: Memoir of a Remarkable Life by Africa’s First Woman President.
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Hero of September: Lili’uokalani

Liliʻuokalani-01Our woman hero of September is Lili’uokalani! She was the first queen regnant and last sovereign monarch of the Kingdom of Hawaiʻi, ruling from 29 January 1891 until the overthrow of the Kingdom of Hawaiʻi on 17 January 1893. Lili’uokalani was an accomplished author and songwriter. Her book Hawaiʻi’s Story by Hawaiʻi’s Queen gave her view of the history of her country and her overthrow. She is said to have played guitar, piano, organ, ʻukulele and zither, and also sang alto, performing Hawaiian and English sacred and secular music. One of her compositions was “Aloha ʻOe” or “Farewell to Thee”. Today, it is one of the most recognizable Hawaiian songs. Continue reading

Hero of August: Mother Teresa

Mother Theresa only-01Our woman hero of August is Mother Teresa! Mother Teresa, who was born on 26 August 1910, was an Albanian-Indian Roman Catholic nun and missionary. In 1950 Mother Teresa founded the Missionaries of Charity, a Roman Catholic religious congregation that had over 4,000 sisters and an associated brotherhood of 300 members operating 610 missions in 123 countries. These included hospices and homes for people with HIV/AIDS, leprosy and tuberculosis, soup kitchens, children’s- and family-counselling programs, orphanages and schools. She was admired and praised by many for her charitable work, but was also criticized for her opposition to abortion and for poor conditions in her houses for the dying. Continue reading